Dry Comtact Spindle

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Reset
Posts: 3
Joined: Sat Jun 06, 2020 11:46 am

Dry Comtact Spindle

Post by Reset » Fri Jun 26, 2020 3:52 pm

Where would you connect the dry contact input trigger for a plasma cutter or switched 12v for a relay when you are not using a VFD spindle. I have looked over all the documentation and can not find it. Is that what L1 and L2 are for? If not what gcode turns on L1 and L2. The only other outputs I see on the breakout board are for flood and mist coolant.

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Doug
Posts: 138
Joined: Fri Feb 02, 2018 4:56 pm

Re: Dry Comtact Spindle

Post by Doug » Sat Jun 27, 2020 7:41 am

M7 turns on L1, M8 turns on L2, and M9 turns them both off. M7, M8, and M9 are normally used for controlling coolant and mist.

The L1 and L2 ports on the back panel of the BB Controller are high power outputs. When turned on, they will present the power supply voltage. They can supply a lot of current as well. When you use these you are limited to only the voltage that you are putting into the BB Controller with your power supply.

L1 and L2 outputs are also found on the DB25 I/O connector at pins. L1 is on pin 2 and L2 is on pin1. These are 3.3Volt outputs and very limited in current.

I think pin 15 on the DB25 connector is what you are looking for. This is the 'tool-enable' pin. It is also a 3.3 Volt output and limited in current. Pin 15 is controlled with the Speed command (S), the Spin Clockwise command (M3), the Spin Counter Clockwise command (M4), and the Stop Spindle command (M5). Note, you have to provide a non-zero speed value along with the spin command to make 'tool-enable' come on. For instance, M3S0 would not cause it to come on, but M3S1000 would.

It is unlikely that the 3.3Volt outputs will drive the input to your torch, so you will probably need a solid state relay. I have used the SSR-40 DA for controlling AC loads. Here is a link to those relays:
https://www.amazon.com/SSR-40DA-Solid-O ... 9125&psc=1

And, I have used the SSR-40 DD for controlling DC loads. Here is a link for those relays.
https://www.amazon.com/Aexit-Temperatur ... =hi&sr=1-8

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